Sculpture
JIEUN JANG Sculpture abandoned wood, thread, tracing paper, Acrylic panel, and spray paint
A Gate Into MicroWorld
2017
abandoned wood, thread, tracing paper, Acrylic panel, and spray paint

This work has been installed at Chungmuro Pildong1ga 24, Seoul, South Korea (Yesultong Open Museum)

JIEUN JANG Sculpture


JIEUN JANG Sculpture


JIEUN JANG Sculpture abandoned wood, thread, and tracing paper
A Gate Into MicroWorld (in progress)
2016
abandoned wood, thread, and tracing paper

I have worked with discarded woods and papers for building sculpture. They are like emotions we easily ignore. I installed this sculpture on the street. people easily pass by without noticing it. I aim to encourage the viewer to appreciate the moments of intimacy that are usually ignored. the sculpture is in progress. it is ongoing project for few months, started in May 2016.

JIEUN JANG Sculpture
A Gate Into MicroWorld (detailed picture)

JIEUN JANG Sculpture
A Gate Into MicroWorld (detailed picture in progress)

JIEUN JANG Sculpture
A Gate Into MicroWorld (detailed picture in progress)

JIEUN JANG Sculpture mixed media
installation view of the movement with a rock having voice
2015
mixed media

JIEUN JANG Sculpture abandoned wood, plexiglass, and transparent tape
Unseen picture (bottom - A rock having voice)
2015
abandoned wood, plexiglass, and transparent tape
13.8 x 11.2 inches

Because I seek in my work to explore invisible existence, including, for example, the air we breathe, I also incorporate transparency into my sculpture, as both an object and a concept. Conceptually, transparency is important because it suggests both what is there and what cannot be seen. On an object level, I make use of transparent tape, which is an everyday material that works to remind us of unseen things in our daily lives.

We should not assume that invisibility or transparency means something does not exist. Unlike our environment that considers our visible, physical benefits more important, invisible precious existents are around our lives, still.

JIEUN JANG Sculpture abandoned wood, plexiglass, and transparent tape
Unseen picture (bottom - A rock having voice)
2015
abandoned wood, plexiglass, and transparent tape
13.8 x 11.2 inches

JIEUN JANG Sculpture abandoned wood and video projector
A Rock Having Voice
2015
abandoned wood and video projector
43 x 13.5 x 13 inches

JIEUN JANG Sculpture Wood, thread, and video projection
The movement
2014
Wood, thread, and video projection
15 x 60 x 7 inches

The sculpture Movements (2014) represents my first attempt to explore everyday movements through building machine-like sculpture.

Bringing video into collaboration with the sculpture allows me to unsettle machine processes and their mathematical functionality to find a potentially mobile aesthetic image—to remind us of everyday unseen things. We know largely what will come from our movements of the machines; through video’s medium I hope to emphasize process by destabilizing outcome. Motion gives breath to sculpture, animating it. I hope to push the limits of video and sculpture, and to explore new dynamics between the two mediums. By using delicate hand gestures in the video, I aim to encourage the viewer to appreciate the moments of intimacy that are usually ignored.

JIEUN JANG Sculpture
detailed picture with video projection

wall-based sculpture with three video projections exploring the interplay between physical, constructed elements and the video loops.

JIEUN JANG Sculpture
detailed picture _center with video projection

JIEUN JANG Sculpture
detailed picture with video projection

JIEUN JANG Sculpture mixed media
Place to dream
2014
mixed media
50 x 18 x 17 inches

Volunteering in Burma in 2008, I helped people recovering from the severe cyclone storm, Nargis. Collapsed houses were everywhere, and people had lost all their belongings. Television showed relief materials delivered to local people, but by night policemen took these away. It looked like a hopeless place.

I believe people in those places of despair could pursue their lives with hope. Anyone who helps people in need, or anyone who lives their lives in difficulty, needs strength and energy to hold out. I believe this comes from faith and hope. There is no shortcut to realize hope, but it is necessary to take one step forward.

I heard the Burmese government does not educate people in the arts. This is because art makes people think, which would possibly make them change social problems. I try to express my impression about this and give voice to encourage people to have the strength to change their world. I hope people will dream in this space.

JIEUN JANG Sculpture
detailed picture_1

JIEUN JANG Sculpture
detailed picture_2

JIEUN JANG Sculpture
detailed picture_3

JIEUN JANG Sculpture mixed media
drawing traces _study of structure and form
2014
mixed media

JIEUN JANG Sculpture
drawing traces #structure 1
2014
9.5 x 21 x 5 inches

JIEUN JANG Sculpture tracing paper, graphite, thread and wood
Growing tree
2014
tracing paper, graphite, thread and wood
12 x 34.5 x 2.5 inches

JIEUN JANG Sculpture
detailed picture_1

JIEUN JANG Sculpture
detailed picture_2

JIEUN JANG Sculpture Wood, tracing paper and thread
Bring to perfection
2014
Wood, tracing paper and thread
24 x 25 x 26 inches

JIEUN JANG Sculpture
detailed picture_1

JIEUN JANG Sculpture
detailed picture_2

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